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Quantum Computing | Intel Newsroom

Quantum computing is an exciting new computing paradigm with unique problems to be solved and new physics to be discovered. Quantum computing, in essence, is the ultimate in parallel computing, with the potential to tackle problems conventional computers can’t handle. For example, quantum computers may simulate nature to advance research in chemistry, materials science and molecular modeling. In 2015, Intel established a collaborative relationship with QuTech to accelerate advancements in quantum computing. The collaboration spans the entire quantum system — or “stack” — from qubit devices to the hardware and software architecture required to control these devices as well as quantum applications. All of these elements are essential to advancing quantum computing from research to reality.

Quantum Computing News

Intel & QuTech

  • Intel Jim Clarke

    Jim Clarke, Intel Corporation’s director of quantum hardware, holds an Intel 49-qubit quantum test chip, called “Tangle Lake,” in front of a dilution refrigerator at QuTech’s quantum computing lab inside Delft University of Technology in July 2018. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel QuTech Delft 1

    Florian Unseld (left) and Kian van der Enden, research assistants at QuTech, work on a readout tool for an Intel quantum test chip at Delft University in July 2018. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel QuTech Delft 2

    Dr. Leonardo DiCarlo, professor of superconducting quantum circuits, works on a dilution refrigerator for quantum computing at Delft University of Technology in July 2018. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel QuTech Delft 3

    Brian Tarasimski, (left) post-doctoral researcher, and Dr. Leonardo DiCarlo, professor of superconducting quantum circuits, both of QuTech, work on a dilution refrigerator for quantum computing at Delft University of Technology in July 2018. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel QuTech Delft 4

    A July 2018 photo shows a dilution refrigerator at QuTech’s quantum computing lab. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel QuTech Delft 5

    A July 2018 photo shows a dilution refrigerator at QuTech’s quantum computing lab. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel QuTech Delft 6

    A July 2018 photo shows a dilution refrigerator at QuTech’s quantum computing lab. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel QuTech Delft 7

    A July 2018 photo shows a dilution refrigerator at QuTech’s quantum computing lab. QuTech at Delft University of Technology is Intel Corporation’s quantum computing research partner in the Netherlands. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel Spin Qubit 1

    A July 2018 photos shows an Intel Corporation-manufactured wafer that contains working spin qubits. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel Spin Qubit 2

    A July 2018 photos shows an Intel Corporation-manufactured wafer that contains working spin qubits. (Credit: Tim Herman/Intel Corporation)

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  • Changing the World with Quantum Computing | Intel

    Changing the World with Quantum Computing | Intel

  • Intel & Qutech Advance Quantum Computing Research (B-roll)

    Intel & Qutech Advance Quantum Computing Research (B-roll)

» Download video: “Intel & Qutech Advance Quantum Computing Research (B-roll)”

49-Qubit Processor

49 qubit processor tangle lake infographic sm» Click for full infographic

Spin Qubits

Graphics

http://newsroom.intel.com/ » Download “A Quantum Computing Primer”

Images

  • Spin Qubit Intel 1

    Intel Corporation has invented a spin qubit fabrication flow on its 300 mm process technology using isotopically pure wafers like this one. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

  • Spin Qubit Intel 2

    Intel Corporation has invented a spin qubit fabrication flow on its 300 mm process technology using isotopically pure wafers like this one. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel-Quantum-17-Qubit-1

    Intel’s director of quantum hardware, Jim Clarke, holds the new 17-qubit superconducting test chip. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

  • Intel-Quantum-17-Qubit-2

    Intel’s 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing has unique features for improved connectivity and better electrical and thermo-mechanical performance. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

  • Researchers work in the quantum computing lab at QuTech, Intel

    Researchers work in the quantum computing lab at QuTech, Intel’s quantum research partner in the Netherlands. Intel in October 2017 provided QuTech a 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing. (Credit: QuTech)

  • Professor Leo DiCarlo poses in the quantum computing lab at QuTe

    Professor Leo DiCarlo poses in the quantum computing lab at QuTech, Intel’s quantum research partner in the Netherlands. Intel in October 2017 provided QuTech a 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing. (Credit: QuTech)

  • Intel is collaborating with QuTech in the Netherlands to advance

    Intel is collaborating with QuTech in the Netherlands to advance quantum computing research. Intel in October 2017 provided QuTech a 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

  • Intel’s new 17-qubit superconducting test chip packaged for deli

    Intel’s new 17-qubit superconducting test chip packaged for delivery to research partners at QuTech, Intel’s quantum research partner in the Netherlands. Intel in October 2017 provided QuTech with the 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

  • Intel Spin Qubit

    A 2018 photo shows Intel’s new quantum computing chip balanced on a pencil eraser. Researchers started testing this “spin qubit chip” at the extremely low temperatures necessary for quantum computing: about 460 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. Intel projects that qubit-based quantum computers, which operate based on the behaviors of single electrons, could someday be more powerful than today’s supercomputers. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

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Quantum Computing at 2018 CES

  • Intel Corporation is making fast progress scaling superconductin

    Intel Corporation is making fast progress scaling superconducting quantum computing test chips to higher qubit counts — from 7, to 17 and now 49 qubits (left to right). Multiple gold connectors are required to control and operate each qubit. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel-Quantum-49-qubit-1

    Intel Corporation’s 49-qubit quantum computing test chip, code-named “Tangle Lake,” is unveiled at 2018 CES in Las Vegas. (Credit: Walden Kirsch/Intel Corporation)

  • Intel Corporation’s self-learning neuromorphic research chip, co

    Intel Corporation’s self-learning neuromorphic research chip, code-named “Loihi.” (Credit: Intel Corporation)

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